Prophets in the wilderness : the Wesleyan Mission to New Zealand 1819-27 / J.M.R. Owens.

By: Owens, J. M. R. (John Morley Roberts), 1926-Publication details: [Auckland, N.Z.] : Auckland University Press ; Oxford University Press, c1974Description: 192 p., [4] p. of plates : ill., map ; 23 cmISBN: 0196478952; 9780196478951Subject(s): Methodist Church of New Zealand -- History | Wesleyan Methodist Church -- Missions -- New Zealand | Methodist Church -- Missions | Missions, New Zealand | Māori (New Zealand people) -- Missions
Contents:
Origins -- Early days at Whangaroa -- The death of George -- Dreadful depravity -- The sack of Whangaroa -- Why was Whangaroa attacked? -- The social context of missionary activity -- The exchange of ideas.
Summary: "New Zealand missionaries have been variously painted as heroes, villains, or figures of fun ; and in this portrait of the origins of the Wesleyan mission at Whangaroa in the 1820s the reader can take his choice. For the story is largely told in the missionaries' own words, from contemporary letters and journals which have gradually become available in libraries and archives throughout New Zealand, Australia and Britain. The first part is a narrative, beginning with pious hopes, continuing with the slow erosion of unexpected stress, ending finally with an attack on the mission station and the missionaries fleeing for their lives. It is a dramatic story, told with a day-by-day human detail which gives it some of the immediacy of a historical novel. The second part of the book tackles the detective problem of why the mission station was attacked and by whom ; and goes on to examine the range of sanctions controlling behaviour of missionaries and Maoris and the exchange of religious ideas between them. It challenges many accepted views about the missionary role and the origin of race relations in New Zealand and is a case study inviting comparison with missionary and contact situations throughout the world." -- Inside front cover.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode
Main Collection Bishopdale Theological College
BV3665 OWE (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available A4227890X
Main Collection Diocese of Wellington
BV3665 OWE (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available A38891707
New Zealand/Pacific John Kinder Theological Library
BX8325.3 OWE (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Not for loan J00172296
Main Collection John Kinder Theological Library
BV3665 OWE (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available J00683993
Main Collection John Kinder Theological Library
BV3665 OWE (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available J00524963
Main Collection John Kinder Theological Library
BV3665 OWE (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available J00172285
Main Collection John Kinder Theological Library
BV3665 OWE (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available J00172274
Main Collection Theology House
BV3665 OWE (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available A00029914

Includes bibliographical references (p. 179-183) and index.

Origins -- Early days at Whangaroa -- The death of George -- Dreadful depravity -- The sack of Whangaroa -- Why was Whangaroa attacked? -- The social context of missionary activity -- The exchange of ideas.

"New Zealand missionaries have been variously painted as heroes, villains, or figures of fun ; and in this portrait of the origins of the Wesleyan mission at Whangaroa in the 1820s the reader can take his choice. For the story is largely told in the missionaries' own words, from contemporary letters and journals which have gradually become available in libraries and archives throughout New Zealand, Australia and Britain. The first part is a narrative, beginning with pious hopes, continuing with the slow erosion of unexpected stress, ending finally with an attack on the mission station and the missionaries fleeing for their lives. It is a dramatic story, told with a day-by-day human detail which gives it some of the immediacy of a historical novel. The second part of the book tackles the detective problem of why the mission station was attacked and by whom ; and goes on to examine the range of sanctions controlling behaviour of missionaries and Maoris and the exchange of religious ideas between them. It challenges many accepted views about the missionary role and the origin of race relations in New Zealand and is a case study inviting comparison with missionary and contact situations throughout the world." -- Inside front cover.

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